Showing posts with label Hip Hop. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hip Hop. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 3, 2020

Ramzi Salti Interviews Groundbreaking Arab Rapper Emsallam (October 2020)

Watch video at https://youtu.be/MJrZOBZXSgA
Watch video at this link

October 2020--Stanford Lecturer + Arabology host Dr. Ramzi Salti interviewed audio visual artist + rapper Emsallam who joined us by Zoom, live from Russia, in order to take us on a track-by-track journey of his new album Dyslexia (released at the end of Oct 2020).   See list of tracks below.

You can watch the video below or at https://youtu.be/MJrZOBZXSgA


Here is a list of featured audio excerpts from Emsallam's Dyslexia album © Keife Records 2020 
Click on time following each track to go directly to that segment in interview.

01- Emsallam - Ferdy (15:40
02- Emsallam - PMWL (17:40
03- Emsallam Ft Adan Wakeen - Aref Enak (24:09
04- Emsallam - Dasher 7osromna (28:36
05- Emsallam - Sea Weed (31:07
06- Emsallam Ft Tamer Naffar - Walla 5a6ar 3ala bali (35:18
07- Emsallam - La Malamah (36:57
08- Emsallam - Made in Mama (39:43
09- Emsallam - Ya 3alem el 7al (41:49
10- Emsallam - Ana Illy Kan Ma3aya (INTRO OUTRO) (44:49

FEATURED VIDEO TEASERS: 

1. Khawa (6:44) featuring Krist Zoubi and Produced by The Archiducer, Sampled from the Syrian Series "Ma Fi Amal" theme song, and one of Emsallam's album The Last Step released 03/09/16 Filmed by Zack Al Kharouf. Edited, Coloured, And Directed By Msallam Hdaib 

2. Dasher Hosromna Written and performed by Emsallam. Produced by Ayman Salhi AKA The Archiducer. Mixed and mastered by Ayman Salhi AKA The Archiducer © Keife Records 2020 https://www.facebook.com/keiferecords... 

3. Aref Innak by Emsallam featuring Adan Wakeem. Co-produced by Emsallam and Ayman Alsalhi AKA The Archiduce. Mixed and mastered by Ayman Alsalhi AKA The Archiducer. Music video directed, shot, edited by Tanya Marar. Title card by Naji Al abbadi Starring: Salma Malhas 

Follow Emsallam:


Saturday, March 23, 2019

DJ Sotusura Releases New Album Ft Addictive Remixes and Beats



The latest album by Cairo-based DJ Sotusura has just been released, and it contains some amazing tracks and remixes that will keep you bopping for days.  The album features a mixture of old school hiphop beats mixed with old Arabic samples taken from records that he has collected over the past 6 years.

Titled Saleh Alalhan, this instrumental album includes 16 tracks that were fully produced by DJ Sotusura.  It was released on March 9th 2019 on all platforms and is set to be released on vinyl in June 2019. 

DJ Sotusura has been collecting vinyl records since 2001 and has long focused on finding rare, previously released recordings/gems from the Middle East.

You can sample/purchase the album below or at https://soturecords.bandcamp.com



Friday, August 19, 2016

Arabology 10.5 Podcast Spotlights Arabic Reggae, Hip Hop, Ballads, Electronica, Folk + Interviews

https://soundcloud.com/arabology/arabology105

Arabology 10.5 aired on August 18, 2016 and featured indie Arabic music by groundbreaking musicians from Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt, Syria, Kuwait, Sudan (Nubia), Morocco, Lebanon, Palestine/Israel--plus 2 tracks by Zebda the Spy from Cairo, including a special Fairuz remix.
Listen to the podcast below or at https://soundcloud.com/arabology/arabology105



Show also included interview with Arab American author Frank Gelat, author of the bilingual Arabic/English book of proverbs The Forbidden Heights (order your copy at www.forbiddenheights.com/main/book-buy)

This podcast also featured an interview (ft musical excerpts) with Egyptian American Opera singer Ashraf Sewailam who spoke about Opera in the Arab world and beyond.

Playlist at THIS LINK.



Friday, March 25, 2016

Arabology 10.1 Podcast Features Various Musical Genres

https://soundcloud.com/arabology/arabology101
Arabology kicked off its tenth season on March 23, 2016 with a special show that featured various genres in indie Arabic music from electronic, hip hop, and dub to jazz, ballads, remixes, and instrumentals.



Arabology is a radio program that is hosted by Dr. Ramzi Salti, Lecturer at Stanford University, showcasing music and other cultural productions from the Arab world. 'Arabology' airs on KZSU 90.1 FM and previous podcasts are available at this link.

Playlist for Arabology 23 March 2016 DJ: Ramzi S.
Artist/Track/Album/Label
1. Soapkills (Rawi Mossa)/Galbi/Rawi Mossa Remix/Zeid Hamdan
2. Fairuz/ Akher Ayyam (Weela Remix/ Weela Rahbani/Weela
3. Zebda The Spy from Cairo/ Taksim Square/ Arabadub/ Wonderwheel Recordings
4. Apo and the Apostles/ Lina/ Under the Zeitun Tree/ Chimichanga Records
5. Janan/ La7za/ Single/ Janan
6. Zaid Bawab ft Jeena Haddadin/ Habib El Rouh/ Single/Bawab and Gus Kahn
7. Badiaa Bouhrizi (Neyssatou)/ Interlude/ NA
8. Didi and the Jempress/ Feen Nelqak/ Diapazone/ Idris Nadi
9. 3xoj (Othmane Jmad)/ Lawrence of Arabia (ft Asmahan)/ Diapazone/ Othman Jmad
10. Zaou (Maher Zaouali)/ Ya Msafir Wahdak Remix/NA
11. City of Djinn/ Insan Haywan/ Ether and Red Sulphur/ Somnimage
12. AlBsmeh Al3rbieh/ Malleyt/ Single/NA
13. Alhajez (Ahmed Hegazi)/Bayan/ Single/Rahal Beats
14. Naima Shalhoub/ Qaddouka Al Mayyas/ Live in SF County Jail/ Naima Shalhoub
15. Tarabband/ Misteniyak/ Ashofak Baden/ Kap Syd
16. Yarub Smarait/ Balad Al Mahboub / Ya Salam/ Yarub Smeirat
17. Mohamed Najem/ Hal Asmar El Loun/ Floor No 4/ DARNA
18. Tarek Yamani/ Ah Ya Zein (Afro Dabke Style)/ Lisan Al Tarab: Jazz Conceptions in Classical Arabic/ Edict Records
19. Ibrahim Maalouf/ Alf leila wa Leila / Kalhoum/M'ister Productions
20. Rahim Alhaj/ The Loving Mother/ Infinite Hope/UP Music






Monday, May 20, 2013

Hip Hop Event Moderated by Ramzi Salti ft DAM, Omar Offendum (Video Segments)

The 'Tradition and Modernity: Globalization of Hip Hop Spotlight Omar Offendum and DAM' event took place at Stanford University on April 6, 2013 and was moderated by Dr. Ramzi Salti, Arabic Lecturer at Stanford and radio talk show host of KZSU's "Arabology." See video segments from this event below.


This event was recorded in its entirety (see video segments below) and included live interviews with artists Omar Offendum and members of DAM (Tamer Nafar, Suhell Nafar, Mahmood Jrere), plus concert by both Offendum and DAM, ft. DJ Emancipacion.

The event was organizer by Stanford student Farah Weheba and was co-sponsored by Murray House, CSRE, MSAN, Residential Education, Cardinal Nights, Riddell Fund, The Sohaib & Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, SSNW, SPE.

Part 1 includes intro by Farah Weheba and Ramzi Salti's interview with DAM and Omar Offendum 
http://youtu.be/oZCycyYIXrQ


Part 2 features second part of Ramzi Salti's interview with DAM and Omar Offendum.
http://youtu.be/9ndQ2fcmlXU


Part 3 features Omar Offendum in Concert
http://youtu.be/YzeZH01J484


Part 4 features the last segment of Omar Offendum in Concert.
http://youtu.be/E1lZFMu4QOQ


Part 5 features concert by DAM
http://youtu.be/R59Klwb76jM


Or watch all videos in a row via the Playlist below:


Pictures from the Globalization of Hip Hop Spotlight Omar Offendum and DAM

Event organizer Farah Weheba (left) with Ramzi Salti

Ramzi Salti (left) with DAM group members







DAM in concert


Omar Offendum in concert



Tuesday, May 7, 2013

May 13: 'Improvising the Hip-Hop Muslim International' at Stanford



Free Your Mind! IMPROVISING THE HIP-HOP MUSLIM INTERNATIONAL


DATE/TIME: MAY 13, 4:15PM – 5:45PM
LOCATION: CEMEX AUDITORIUM, ZAMBRANO HALL 641 KNIGHT WAY, STANFORD, CA 94305

Omar Offendum is a Syrian-American Hip-Hop artist – born in Saudi Arabia, raised in Washington DC and living in Los Angeles.

Sohail Daulatzai is an Associate Professor of both Film and Media Studies and African American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. 

In the 21st century, we all improvise identity and race. In this so-called “post-identity” era, improvisation is a metaphor for both how we construct our selves and the mode through which we create our selves. Throughout this 10-week course, we will explore how artists improvise identity through jazz music, modern dance, drag performance, contemporary art, race comedy, food, hip-hop theory, and freestyl

FREE and Open to the Public

For more info see http://arts.stanford.edu/event/free-your-mind-improvising-the-hip-hop-muslim-international/

Co-Sponsored By: African & African American Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Asian American Student Association, The Cantor Arts Center, Center For African Studies, Undergraduate program in CSRE, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE), Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies, Institute on the Politics of Inequality, Race and Ethnicity at Stanford (InsPIRES), Jewish Studies, Music, Office Of The Provost, Religious Studies, Senior Associate Dean for the Humanities & Arts, Stanford Arts Institute, Stanford Humanities Center, Vice Provost for Student Affairs, and the Vice Provost for Undergraduate EducationFor more information visit diversityarts.stanford.edu

Friday, April 19, 2013

April 18 'Arabology' Podcast ft interviews w/ Ashley Lohmann, DAM, Omar Offendum


The April 18 'Arabology' Podcast features interview with Ashley Lohmann (creator of Beyond the Bombs site). Also includes my interviews with Palestinian band DAM and Omar Offendum--recorded at the 'Globalization of Hip Hop' event which I moderated at Stanford on April 6.  Plus intro by Farah Weheba and alternative music from the region.

LISTEN BELOW or at https://soundcloud.com/arabology/arabology-s5-episode-2



Saturday, April 13, 2013

5th Season 'Arabology' Debut Incl Interv w/ Omar Offendum and More



The April 11, 2013 Arabology Podcast (Season 5 Episode 1) features an interview with Syrian American Hip Hop artist Omar Offendum (who performed along with the group DAM at Stanford on April 13, 2013). Show also showcases 'alternative' music by Joussour, Michel Sajrawy, Gene Band, Saffron, Mashrou' Leila, Egyptian Project, JIMH, Elizabeth Ayoub, SAM, Zeid and the Wings, Mike Massy, and the Bay Area Music Ensemble Aswat.


DJ Ramzi (left) with Omar Offendum at Stanford April 2013


Saturday, May 7, 2011

Brooklyn Beats to Beirut Streets Artist Workshop at Stanford ft. Omar Offendum, Nizar Wattad, Mark Gonzales



 Omar Offendum, Nizar Wattad, Mark Gonzales at the Coho, Stanford

The CoHo at Stanford University was full of students on April 29, 2011 who came to watch the "Brooklyn Beats to Beirut Streets" Artist Workshop featuring Omar Offendum, Nizar Wattad, Mark Gonzales (The Human Writes Project).

The performance, which featured all three speakers reflecting and rapping about their lives, their identity quest(s), politics, East-West relations, and much more, was applauded by the audience who later engaged the 3 artists in an extensive Q & A session.

The event was organized as part of the "Global Flows--Globalization of Hip hop Art, Culture, and Politics" series of events/course offered at Stanford by Professor H. Samy Alim.

Below are some exclusive pictures and FOUR short video clips from the event.





VIDEO CLIPS FROM EVENT:

Stanford Professor H. Samy Alim's Opening Remarks

Mark Gonzales, Omar Offendum, Nizar Wattad

Omar Offendum Quotes Al-Mtanabbi

Omar Offendum Arabic Rap


Thursday, February 17, 2011

Rage, Rap and Revolution: Inside the Arab Youth Quake (Time Magazine)

Tunisian Rapper "El General" 

Rage, Rap and Revolution: 

Inside the Arab Youth Quake






A generation once dismissed as politically supine has toppled two dictators and shaken up regimes across the Middle East. Who are the Arab youth, and what do they want?




At 6:30 p.m. on Feb. 15, as thousands of people gathered to protest against their ruler at a busy intersection in Manama, the capital of the small island nation of Bahrain, you could just about hear over the general hubbub the anthem of the young people who have shaken regimes from North Africa to the Arabian Gulf. It wasn't a verse from the Koran. It wasn't a traditional tune from the region. It was rap. A reedy female voice shouted out, several times, the first line of "Rais Lebled," a song written by the Tunisian rapper known as El Général. "Mr. President, your people are dying," the woman sang. Then others joined in. "Mr. President, your people are dying/ People are eating rubbish/ Look at what is happening/ Miseries everywhere, Mr. President/ I talk with no fear/ Although I know I will get only trouble/ I see injustice everywhere."

Bahrain, as it happens, doesn't have a President; it's ruled by a King, Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa. No matter. The protesters in Bahrain knew that "Rais Lebled" was the battle hymn of the Jasmine Revolution that brought down Tunisia's dictator, Zine el Abidine Ben Ali, and that it was then adopted by the demonstrators in Cairo's Tahrir Square who toppled Hosni Mubarak. Now it had come to Bahrain, as rage against poverty and oppression swept the Arab world from west to east. It isn't just songs that are being copied: in a nod to the Egyptians, organizers in several countries have dubbed their demonstrations Days of Rage, and the popular Tunisian chant, "The people want the regime to fall," has been taken up by protesters from Algeria to Yemen.
But the most important things 2011's protests have in common don't come from copying — they come naturally. All of the revolts are led by young men and women, many of whom are novices at political activism. All use modern tools, like social-networking sites on the Internet and texting over mobile phones, to organize and amplify their protests. And all have the same demands: a right to choose and change their leaders, an end to rampant corruption, the opportunity for employment and improvement. "Whether you're in Tunis or in Cairo or in Manama," says Ala'a Shehabi, 30, a Bahraini economics lecturer and political activist, "young Arabs are all on the same wavelength."

In less than two months, this generation has already wrought political change on a scale not seen since the end of the Cold War. The class of 2011 has felled two despots and forced other famously inflexible rulers to make concessions, some dramatic (Yemen's longtime President Ali Abdullah Saleh has promised not to run for re-election) and some desperate (King Hamad has offered every Bahraini household the equivalent of $2,700). And all this was achieved by largely peaceful demonstrations and despite the absence of clear leaders.
There may be more to come. Growing protests in Bahrain and Yemen could lead to greater concessions from their rulers. And the Arab uprising has already given a boost to the flagging Green Revolution in Iran. (That, in turn, has provoked a fierce crackdown by government forces.) There have also been demonstrations in Libya against the regime of "Brother Leader" Muammar Gaddafi. So who are the Middle East's new revolutionaries? Where do they come from, and what do they want?

Getting the Young People Wrong
Even those who have watched this generation come of age in the Middle East struggle to explain its sudden empowerment. "These young people have done more in a few weeks than their parents did in 30 years," says Hassan Nafaa, a political-science professor at Cairo University. "They are the Internet Generation ... or the Facebook Generation ... or just call them the Miracle Generation."

Yet not so long ago, these were the men and women who were being called the lost generation. For years, Middle East experts had described Arab youths as frustrated but feckless: they disliked and distrusted their authoritarian rulers, they keenly felt their limited economic prospects, but they were too politically emasculated to press for change. They were thoroughly intimidated by the Mubaraks and Salehs, together with their ubiquitous, Orwellian spies and secret police; they were disillusioned by the failed attempts at rebellion by their parents' generation. Western observers were not alone in misreading this generation's potential. "If you had said some years ago that my students would be responsible for democratic change in Egypt, I would have laughed," admits Nafaa.
According to the old narrative, the only outlet for youthful dissent lay in Islamic extremism and violence. A much cited 2003 Brookings Institution report on Arab youths warned that they were being raised in an environment of religious radicalism and anti-Americanism. "These values," the report argued, "thus become the formative elements of a new and dispossessed generation, auguring badly for the future."
The auguries were wrong. In reality, Arab youths were a big part of the silent, moderate majority. In virtually every Arab country, more than half the population is less than 30 years old. And like young people everywhere, most of them prefer the freedom that comes with democracy to the straitjacket of political autocracy or rule by religious conservatives. A survey of youths in nine Arab states released in 2010 by the p.r. firm Asda'a Burson-Marsteller showed that they ranked democracy as a greater priority than good civic infrastructure, access to the best education or even fair wages.



Read more: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2049808,00.html#ixzz1EIHsK4Vp


Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Meet Hamada “El General” Ben Amr, the Tunisian Rapper Who Changed the World

http://popdust.com/2011/01/28/meet-hamada-el-general-ben-amor-the-tunsian-rapper-who-changed-the-world/

حمادة بن عمر "الجنرال" واغنية رئيس البلاد


Hamada “El General” Ben Amr (Amor)
As riots and protests spread throughout Tunisia a few weeks ago, one song helped fan the flames of revolution—and its moment may not be over. In a country plagued with censorship, a Facebook sensation was made of a video called “President, Your People Are Dying,” رئيس البلاد performed by 22-year-old Hamada Ben Amr  حمادة بن عمر (a.k.a. El Général; name can also be spelled Hamada Ben Amor or Ben Aoun).  In the clip, the rapper speaks firmly and directly to now-former President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali about the unemployment and hunger ravaging the country while Ben Ali’s family lived in opulence. December saw the self-immolation of Sidi Bouzid after his produce cart was seized by authorities and the Wikileaks reports where ambassadors spoke openly about government corruption. The feelings of resentment about the poverty, police brutality and government ills were captured perfectly in the song—and subsequently Ben Amr was arrested, sparking more even protests and furor until President Ben Ali fled the country. Its direct role in the Tunisian uprising and potential role in the current instability in the Middle East may make it one of the most influential hip-hop songs of all time.


ABOUT THE SONG




Here are some things to know about the song (Taken from Popdust.com; to read the entire blog entry, see Popdust.com):
1. It’s Sung In Arabic: Naturally, since that’s the national language of Tunisia.
2. It Got Personal: Supporters of the uprising were enraged when Ben Amor was arrested and called in for questions. Ben-Amor’s brother Hamdi said, “Some 30 plainclothes policemen came to our house to arrest Hamada and took him away without ever telling us where to. When we asked why they were arresting him, they said, ‘He knows why.’” The irony of a musician decrying an oppressive police state and then being called in by the secret police was not lost. Because of this collision between protest and power, the song became integral to the protests.

Here are the translated lyrics, courtesy of Hiphopdiplomacy.com



Why are you worried?
Would you tell me something? Don’t be afraid!
Mr. President, today I am speaking in name of myself and of all the people
who are suffering in 2011, there are still people dying of hunger
who want to work to survive, but their voice was not heard
get off into the street and see, people have become like animals
see the police with batons, takatak they don’t care
since there is no one telling him to stop
even the law of the constitution, put it in water and drink it.
Every day I hear of invented process, in spite of the servants of the state know
I see the snake that strikes women in headscarves
you accept it for your daughter?
You know these are words that make your eyes weep
as a father does not want to hurt her children
then this is a message from one of your children
who is telling of his suffering
we are living like dogs
half of the people living in filth
and drank from a cup of suffering

Mr. President your people is dead
many people eat from garbage
and you see what is happening in the country
misery everywhere and people who have not found a place to sleep
I am speaking in name of the people who are suffering and were put under the feet
Mr President, you told me to speak without fear
But I know that eventually I will take just slaps
I see too much injustice and so I decided to send this message even though the people told me that my end is death
But until when the Tunisian will leave in dreams, where is the right of expression?
They are just words ..
Tunis was defined the “green”, but there is only desert divided into 2,
it is a direct robbery by force that dominated a country
without naming already everybody knows who they are
much money was pledged for projects and infrastructure
schools, hospitals, buildings, houses
But the sons of dogs have already fattened
They stole, robbed, kidnapped and were unwilling to leave the chair
I know that there are many words in the heart of the people but don’t come out
if there was not this injustice I would not be here to say these things
Mr. President your people is dead
many people eat from garbage
and you see what is happening in the country
misery everywhere and people who have not found a place to sleep
I am speaking in name of the people who are suffering and were put under the feet
Ben Amr also has another song available on the internet titled تونس بلادنا (Tunisia Is Our Country) with similar themes:






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Ramzi Salti's Arabology Radio Show Counts Down Top 20 Indie Arabic Songs of 2018

Listen to this episode at  https://soundcloud.com/arabology/top2018 The latest episode of the popular radio show Arabology , which air...