Showing posts with label Arab Spring. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Arab Spring. Show all posts

Monday, November 4, 2019

Ramzi Salti's Talk About Indie Arabic Music at Sijal (in English) Available

In this audio-visual lecture (recorded at Sijal Institute in Jordan in July 2019), Stanford Lecturer + Arabology radio host Dr. Ramzi Salti talks about the many ways in which the revolutionary music of the Arab Spring continues to fuel a new generation of artists and musicians--from Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya to Lebanon, Jordan, and Syria.  This video also includes a segment on Palestinian musicians who are creating new musical genres that aim at a better tomorrow.  Video concludes with extensive Q&A session.  Artwork by Jordanian artist Tamer Al Ahmar.

Watch the video below or at https://youtu.be/F5FeL3KssuA



This talk was meant to go along with THIS YOUTUBE PLAYLIST.

This talk spotlights the following segments (chronologically):

01. Katy Whiting Intro (0:00)
02. Ramzi Salti: Intro (02:13)
03. El General (Tunisia) (07:09)
04. Emel Mathlouthi (Tunisia) (11:27)
05. Ramy Essam (Egypt) (15:35)
06. Cairokee (Egypt) (21:20)
07. Ibn Thabit (Libya) (25:38)
08. Mashrou' Leila (Lebanon) (28:57)
09. Zeid Hamdan and Maryam Saleh (Lebanon + Egypt) (37:35)
10. Tania Saleh (Lebanon) (39:44)
11. Omar Offendum (Syria) (43:35)
12. DAM (Palestine) (45:56)
13. Jadal and Autostrad (Jordan) (51:26)
14.  Q & A Session (55:36) featuring questions about Mashrou' Leila (55:59), El General (58:52), 47Soul + El Far3i (1:04:00), Fairuz (1:04:56), Dalida (1:06:06) , and even Olivia Newton-John (1:06:23).

This talk was meant to go along with this playlist:



Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Ramzi's Salti's PowerPoint Presentation: Music of the Arab Spring (English)

Dr. Ramzi Salti's PowerPoint Presentation about the Music of the Arab Spring (with embedded videos). Artwork by Jordanian artist Tamer Al-Ahmar.

  • Click on arrows at bottom left of each image to move forward/backward.
  • Click on icon on the bottom to enlarge/full screen.

 

Saturday, June 8, 2019

Essay about the Music of the Arab Spring by Kristina Abyad

This essay was written by Kristina Abyad, a Junior at the Orange County School of the Arts, for her  AP Language and Composition class in 2019.  Published here with her permission.

How Music Contributed to the Arab Spring

By Kristina Abyad

Beginning in the spring of 2010 and ending approximately one year later, the Arab Spring was a series of political revolts clustered among the nations of the Middle East and North Africa. These revolts were organized and enacted by Arab citizens who were protesting against their corrupt governments and leaders of a multitude of countries throughout the region. Although these titular events officially began in Tunisia, North Africa, political unrest had already been present for many years prior. Governmental corruption, censorship of free speech, and suppression of human rights encouraged Middle Eastern citizens to rise up against their inhumane leaders, and music was the medium through which they were encouraged and emboldened to finally take action.

Tunisia specifically commenced the chain reaction of revolutions with one of its own: the Tunisian Revolution. Beginning on December 18, 2010, this series of events drew in a wide and appalled audience from around the world because of its first contender, Mohamed Bouazizi. A 26-year-old Tunisian street fruit vendor with a family of eight, Bouazizi was confronted by government officials who subsequently took away his unlicensed cart, fined him, and physically assaulted him. Wanting justice for the harassment and humiliation he had encountered at the hands of the government, he “complained to the local municipality officials, but his request was denied” (Karthikeyan). In order to get his message of utter frustration with the government across, his manifestation of protest consisted of self-immolation for all of the world to see (Skalli). His actions consequently sparked a nation-wide movement to overthrow the corrupt Tunisian leader at the time, President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, in an action that was deemed the “Jasmine Revolution” by many local and international news organizations at the time. Months after his overthrow, Ali and his wife “were found guilty in absentia by a Tunisian court for embezzlement and misuse of public funds. They were then sentenced to 35 years in prison” (“Profile: Zine”). His dethroning as a result of citizen revolts and protests inspired successive dissent in other Middle Eastern countries, most notably in Egypt, Yemen, and Libya.

One of the leading contributors to the start of the Arab Spring throughout the region was Arabic political music. This style of song came in a variety of musical forms, such as hip hop, rap, and pop, and was centered on lyrics that called out the corrupt Middle Eastern leaders and dictators for their egregious actions. The widespread popularity of these songs became a significant medium through which the events of the Arab Spring were shared with the world. One of the most prominent figures of the Arab Spring was a Tunisian rapper named Hamada Ben Amor, a man better known as El General. His famed song “Rais Lebled (President of the Country)” quickly gained traction, as it desperately implored President Ali to focus his attention on the suffering youth in Tunisia (Salti). Although Tunisian rapper El General certainly did not begin the Tunisian Revolution, his music played a major role in inspiring the people of Tunisia to revolt. His choice to speak freely about the government in this song led to him being detained and questioned by Tunisian authorities for three full days (Hebblethwaite). He bravely and blatantly spoke of the corruption and poverty that was rampant in the nation. After only a few days after its release on YouTube along with a simple video, it had gone viral and was omnipresent on the lips of every Tunisian citizen for months. The popularity of politically-charged music in the Middle East during the time of the Arab Spring was able to bring to the attention of other nations just how dire the situations were in the MENA region. When the news was ignored, their voices were heard.

Music was similarly used as a way to mobilize and empower Arab citizens throughout the course of the Arab Spring. Tunisian singer Emel Mathlouthi wrote a wide array of political anthems for Tunisia during this period of time that gained traction beyond just the MENA world. She was invited to perform one of her most popular ones, “Kelmti Horra (My Word Is Free)” at the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize concert in Oslo, Norway (Curiel). Like the majority of her songs, this political anthem was sung in Arabic and accompanied with Middle Eastern instrumentals, celebrating her nation’s culture and history. In her performance, Mathlouthi chose not to put translations up for the audience; she just wanted them to listen. Although her music was barred from playing in her home country, Mathlouthi was still able to communicate with her people through her music via social media. Tunisia attempted to ban her music as a result of the lyrics in her songs, but she prevailed in spreading the word to her country’s people and inspiring them to protest against their unjust government.

Outside of Tunisia, political strife was likewise brewing. Egyptian singer Ramy Essam turned popular anti-government chants, yelled out by his fellow Egyptians during protests, into the form of song. One in particular was called “Irhal (Leave),” which was about the then-President Hosni Mubarak (Inskeep). Mubarak had succeeded the last Egyptian president, Anwar Sadat, after his assassination by Islamic extremists. This had occurred directly after Sadat had signed a peace treaty with Israel, angering pro-Palestinians across the nation. Thus, Mubarak was elected in a time of chaos, and he felt pressured to legitimize his presidency in any way he could; often, this was via the Egyptian Army. He arrested Islamists unabashedly, but released secular prisoners that Sadat had previously jailed (Kenyon). As a result of his extreme, anti-Islamic actions and rhetoric, the vast majority of Egyptians wanted Mubarak gone.

Essam then performed “Irhal” in Tahrir Square, Cairo, and his voice was accompanied by thousands of other impassioned Egyptians. Many of them recorded his performance and posted it to YouTube, and the rest became history. Essam was, and often still is, considered to be the voice of the Egyptian Revolution. Because of the actions of Essam and other Egyptian citizens in the process of an eighteen-day revolt against the government, Mubarak, who had ruled since 1981 (during close to five, six-year terms in total), was forced out of his position of power (Knell). Just like the overthrow of Tunisian President Ali, there was not a single drop of blood shed; change was enacted just by the sheer will and determination of the Egyptian people.

As a result of all of the change that had been incited by political Arabic music throughout the Arab Spring, short-term change was finally enacted within many countries across the MENA region. For one, it was now apparent to Middle Eastern leaders and dictators alike that, like Tunisian President Ali and Egyptian President Mubarak, they could be overthrown by the unadulterated perseverance and anger of their people; no military coup was required. All across MENA, citizens were inspired to fight for their rights, and “by the end of 2011, the governments in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Yemen were swept away by popular revolts in an unprecedented show of people power” (Manfreda). Tunisia arguably benefitted the most from the Arab Spring: “it adopted a new modernist constitution and held parliamentary elections in 2014. Thus, it’s no surprise that The Economist designated Tunisia as the 2014 Country of the Year” (Karthikeyan). However, in the long run, many consider Tunisia to be the only true success story of the Arab Spring.

Despite these short-lived apparent successes, failure still loomed on the horizon. In Egypt, even though ex-President Mubarak had been forcibly ousted from his position, the current President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi is arguably much worse. Not only does the military have a tendency to play an over-inflated role in daily citizen life, but with his vehement “repression of students, journalists, activists, and foreigners, [...] Sisi’s Egypt is not that different from the Egypt of earlier eras,” inclining many to argue that the Arab Spring did little to change the lives of Egyptians, despite its best effort (Cook). Mubarak and his corruption may be gone, but Sisi has failed to continue the change that the platform of the Arab Spring had aimed to enact.

In Yemen, President Ali Abdullah Saleh was forced out of his regime after having controlled the nation for over thirty years. Many Yemeni citizens had expected that following his departure, democracy would ensue; however, this was not the case. “Instead[,] an armed uprising and foreign military intervention began a spiral into a brutal, often forgotten, civil war” (Graham-Harrison). The country also endured the worst cholera outbreak in history, starting in 2016 and still continuing today, leading to numerous deaths and extreme famine. Thousands have also been slaughtered by bombs and mines, including a group of young students who were killed after being hit with a missile (Graham-Harrison). Democracy has yet to come to Yemen, and it seems it is still too ludicrous a dream.

In a similarly-dire situation resides Libya. Unlike the aforementioned peaceful and non-violent revolts, the Libyan ex-President Muammar Gaddafi was overthrown, ruthlessly murdered, and his body propped on display (Graham-Harrison). The dissident rebels who had so passionately attacked him then turned to attack one another, splitting up the country even further. Gangs in the nation still hold public slave auctions to this day, and the government makes no real attempt to reduce violent crime. The overthrow of Gaddafi served as a minor stepping stone to the path of freedom and democracy, but these goals became wholly unattainable once the now-President Khalifa Haftar came into power. The country is now still engaging in the Second Libyan Civil War as of 2014, and its military officer president possesses no plans to end it any time soon.

Overall, although these revolts failed to enact any long-standing changes in most of the countries within the MENA region, the way in which these countries were able to use their political music to encourage their citizens to fight for their rights and for what they believed in established the noteworthy position of the events of the Arab Spring in world history. It thoroughly served its purpose of challenging the previously-established ways of the past and helped to usher in new leaders, some of whom were more favorable and successful than others. Regardless of its impact, Arabic political music was the beacon for governmental and social change, encouraging Arab citizens to fight for what is right no matter who disagrees.

This essay was written by Kristina Abyad, a Junior at the Orange County School of the Arts, for her  AP Language and Composition class in 2019.  Published here with her permission.

Works Cited

Cook, Steven A. “Sisi Isn't Mubarak. He's Much Worse.” Foreign Policy, Foreign Policy, 19

Dec. 2018.

Curiel, Jonathan. “Beyond 'Protest Music' in the Arab World... and Beyond.” KQED, 13 Dec.

2016.

Graham-Harrison, Emma. “Beyond Syria: the Arab Spring's Aftermath.” The Guardian,

Guardian News and Media, 30 Dec. 2018,

Hebblethwaite, Cordelia. “Is Hip Hop Driving the Arab Spring?” BBC, BBC News, 24 July.

2011.

Inskeep, Steve. “Ramy Essam: The Singer Of The Egyptian Revolution.” NPR, 15 Mar. 2011.

Karthikeyan, Badri. “Arab Spring Brings Success, Failures.” The Triangle, 27 Feb. 2015.

Kenyon, Peter. “Egypt's Mubarak: A Cautious, Heavy-Handed Ruler.” NPR, NPR, 11 Feb. 2011.

Knell, Yolande. “The Complicated Legacy of Egypt's Hosni Mubarak.” BBC, BBC News, 25

Jan. 2013.

Manfreda, Primoz. “6 Ways Arab Spring Impacted the Middle East.” ThoughtCo, 26 June 2018.

“Profile: Zine Al-Abidine Ben Ali.” BBC News, BBC, 20 June 2011.

Salti, Ramzi. Islamic Voices: Music of the Arab Spring, Stanford Live, 20 Sept. 2016.

Skalli, Loubna Hanna. “Youth, Media and the Art of Protest in North Africa.” Jadaliyya.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Ramzi Salti Interviewed by Ahmed Tharwat

I was honored to be interviewed by Ahmed Tharwat for his show Bilahdan (AhmediaTV) which airs in Minnesota.

The interview centered on the way the music of the Arab Spring has continued to flourish--despite current realities--and to inform indie/alternative Arabic music today.  This segment showcased such musicians as El General, Emel Mathlouthi and Ramy Essam.

Watch below or at https://youtu.be/riClAt07044



For more info see THIS LINK

 Read more at this link (AhmediaTV)
Read more at this link

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Ramzi Salti Discusses Music of Arab Spring Using Zoom Video Communications

Watch at https://youtu.be/zNaTLgmmJ4s

On November 16, 2018, Stanford Lecturer + Arabology radio host Dr. Ramzi Salti discussed the music of the Arab Spring with a remote audience using Zoom Video Communications, a company operating from San Jose, California that provides remote conferencing services using cloud computing. 


You can watch the lecture below or at this link: https://youtu.be/zNaTLgmmJ4s



This lecture  was meant to along with this YouTube Playlist (or scan below to get to Playlist): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Scan code above to go to Playlist

This lecture was presented to the fellows in the Stanford Global Studies Education Partnership for Internationalizing Curriculum (EPIC) program. More info below.

 Arab Spring Music: From Revolution to Revelation
An Audio Visual Lecture by Dr. Ramzi Salti (author30@gmail.com) 
Lecturer at Stanford University + Radio Host of ‘Arabology’ @KZSU 90.1 FM 

Dr. Salti's Arab Spring Music YouTube Playlist

1. Noor - Don't Wanna (Arab Spring / ربيع العرب)

2. El général, the voice of Tunisia, english subtitles

3. My word is Free ( كلمتي حرة ) , English Subtitled (Tunisian revolution)

4. Emel Mathlouthi - Kelmti Horra (Orchestral Version) (+English, French and Arabic Lyrics)

5. Revolutionary Art: Ramy Essam and The Protest of Tahrir Square

6. Ramy Essam at 60 Minutes - CBS News تعذيب رامى عصام 9 مارس

7. Music Amidst Revolution

8. Ramy Essam - Bread Freedom

9. Cairokee - Ethbat Makanak - (English subtitles)

10. Cairokee ft Aida El Ayouby Ya El Medan (English Subs)

11. Massar Egbari - Wana Kol Ma2ol | وأنا كل ماقول - مسار إجباري

12. Massar Egbari - E2ra El Khabar | مسار إجباري - اقرا الخبر

13. Massar Egbari - Read The News

14. Eskenderella Short Report

15. Eskenderella – Safha Gedeeda

16. Youssra El Hawary - El Soor

17. Ibn Thabit feat. MC Swat - Victory or Death (English Subtitles)

18. Ibn Thabit نداء لشباب ليبيا إبن ثابت

19. Khaled M ft Lowkey - Can't Take Our Freedom

20. Souad Massi - Raoui English translation

21. Souad Massi – Raoui (Live)

22. Rachid Taha - Ya rayah (English subtitles)

23. Amine AUB & Masta Flow - Kan Ya Ma Kan (Music Video) | أيوبي و ماسطا فلو - كان ياما كان

24. Mashrou Leila on Dateline: Rocking the Middle East

25. Mashrou' Leila - Ghadan Yawmon Afdal

26. Zeid and the Wings - GENERAL SULEIMAN

27. Zeid Hamdan and Maryam Saleh | Eslahat

28. Fareeq El Atrash - Lawein & Ba'ed Min Hon (Video Clip)

29. Tania Kassis - Islamo-Christian AVE (live at l'Olympia) | تانيا قسيس - الصلاة الإسلامية المسيحية

30. Tania Kassis - Watani (live from Sydney Opera House)

31. Tania Saleh - Omar & Ali عمروعلي LIVE

32. Tania Saleh – It’s Springtime

33. Hiba Tawaji - Al Rabih Al Arabi [Official Music Video] (2014

34. Tanjaret Daghet - Ta7t El Daghet / Under Pressure (Official Music Video)

35. Tanjaret Daghet Our Dream for Syria

36. Omar Offendum - #SYRIA

37. Malek Jandali - Watani Ana

38. DAM - Change Tomorrow with English Subtitle

39. DAM featuring AMAL MURKUS - If I Could Go Back In Time لو أرجع بالزمن

40. Rim Banna - The Absent One

41. JOWAN SAFADI – TO BE AN ARAB

42. JOWAN SAFADI & TAMER NAFAR - AWAL BAWAL

43. Revolution Makers - غزة افتحي قلبك - صناع الثورة

44. Basel Zayed - Gaza

45. Jadal - El Makina (Official Lyric Clip)

46. Yazan Al Rousan Feat. Hana Malhas - Trouh

47. Narcy featuring Shadia Mansour - "Hamdulillah" Official Music Video

48. SHADIA MANSOUR FT. OMAR OFFENDUM - لازم نتغير (We have to change)

49. 47SOUL - Mo Light (Official Video) | السبعة وأربعين - رفّ الطّير

50. Yasmine Hamdan – Balad

Monday, September 26, 2016

Emel Mathlouthi in Concert at Stanford on Oct 5, 2016



Emel Mathlouthi aka the "voice of the Tunisian revolution" brings her songs to Bing Concert Hall at Stanford University on Wednesday Oct 5, 2015 at 7:30 pm. The concert is preceded by a talk by Dr. Ramzi Salti and Prof Joel Beinin at 6:30pm. Buy your tickets here and arrive at 6:30 pm to attend both the talk + concert.

PRE-CONCERT TALK: At 6:30 pm, ]قز Ramzi Salti, host of the podcast Arabology, and Professor Joel Beinin set the stage for Emel Mathlouthi by discussing the Tunisian Revolution, how it launched the Arab Spring, and how her music became its soundtrack.

Tunisian singer and activist Emel Mathlouthi earned the title "the voice of the Arab Spring" with her 2007 recording My Word Is Free  كلمتي حرة—and in the process became her country's Joan Baez (her role model).

"I see art as a very revolutionary way to change mentalities,” says the Tunisian-born Mathlouthi. This potent artist is a singer of compelling, confessional impact, whose music embraces suffering, love, and an ache for home. Though her roots are in folk music, her sound mingles rock, trip-hop, and electronica with Arabic undertones. Her songs of freedom and compassion also earned her a spotlight at the 22nd Annual Nobel Peace Prize Concert in 2015.

Emel Mathlouthi performing at 2015 Nobel Prize Ceremony: https://youtu.be/wJ79iEfus8E


Purchase your tickets for the pre-concert talk + Emel's Concert via this link: http://www.stanfordlivetickets.org/single/SYOS.aspx?p=6825





Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Feb 20 Arabology Podcast Spotlights Music of the Arab Spring + Interview with Ramzi Salti + Arabic Poetry Translated

The tables are turned during the first part of Arabology this week when host Dr. Ramzi Salti is actually interviewed on his own show.  Interview includes music from the Arab Spring and was conducted by Stanford student Samra Adeni of 'Avicenna'--The Stanford Journal on Muslim Affairs--on Feb 20, 2014.

The show also features new, alternative Arabic music and spotlights from Mike Massy's upcoming performance at Stanford on March 11 and features an Arabic poem by Rodayna El Filali which is then translated into English by Ramzi Salti.

Listen below or at https://soundcloud.com/arabology/arabology-s7-episode-6-ramzi



Playlist for Arabology Thurs 20 February 2014  4-6 pm DJ: Ramzi S.
Artist/ Track/ Album/Label

1.  Charbel Moreno / Ah Ya Zine/ Single/ Charbel Moreno
2.  Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 1/ Arabology/ KZSU
3.  El General/ Raes el Blad/ Single/ El General
4.  Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 2/ Arabology/ KZSU
5.  Gultrah Sound Sytem/ Elli tchelou/ Gultrah Sound System/ Ga7af prod!!
6.  Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 3/ Arabology/ KZSU
7.  Sadat & Fifty Cent/ Five Pound Credit/ Generation Bass/ Amr 7a7a
8.  Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 4/ Arabology/ KZSU
9.  Revolution Records ft Ahmed Rock/ Maya3rafsh Skoot/ A Story To Tell/ Revolution Records
10. Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 5/ Arabology/ KZSU
11. Ramy Essam/ Taty Taty/ Rough Guide Arabic Revolution/ World Music Network
12. Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 6/ Arabology/ KZSU
13. Omar Offendum/ Damascus/ Syrianamericana/ Cosher Ink, Llc
14. Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 7/ Arabology/ KZSU
15. Dam/ Kalimat (Words)/ Ihda' (Dedication)/ Redcircle Music
16. Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 8/ Arabology/ KZSU
17. Maryam Saleh/ Nouh Al Hamam/ Sawtuha/ Jakarta Records
18. Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 9/ Arabology/ KZSU
19. Mashrou' Leila/ Ghadan Yawm Afdal/ Single/ Mashrou' Leila
20. Interview with DJ Ramzi/ Part 10/ Arabology/ KZSU
21. Fairuz/ Nassam (Housed Up Remix)/ Dj Nader - Hizzy Hips In The Mix/ Level Up Records
22. Rasha Rizk/ Elegie (Bonus Track)/Sawtuha/ Jakarta Records
23. Ashara Gharby/ Masry/ Single/ Ashara Gharby
24. Jadal/ Fe Nabd Ana Has/ El Makina/ Mahmoud Radaideh
25. Khalas/ Ala Remshi/ Arabic Rock Orchestra/ Khalas Band
26. Akher Zapheer/ Akherto Lahen Hazeen/ Converse Culture/ Eka3
27. Rodayna Al-Filali/ Wasaed wa Sharasheef (Arabic Poem + English Translation)/ Khutwat Untha
28. Mike Massy/ Soti Hareb Menni/ Ya Zaman/ Falak Productions
29. Mike Massy/ Khalasna Ba'a/ Ya Zaman/ Falak Productions
30. Jam Tkseer/ Qaseeda Sherera/ Ganni 3an Ta3rif/ Alqaws

Arabology S7 Episode 6 [Spotlight on Music of Arab Spring موسيقى الربيع العربي] by arabology

Sunday, May 19, 2013

Dr. Ramzi Salti: Stanford Lecture on Arabic Music (including video excerpts)



Dr. Ramzi Salti, Lecturer at Stanford University and Radio Host of 'Arabology' on KZSU 90.1 FM, began a weeklong series of talks titled "Ya'ani: Week of Music, Culture, and Languages of the Middle East" at Stanford on May 13, 2013 with a lecture titled '"Breaking with Tradition: An Examination of Alternative Arabic Music and Video Clips." The talk attempted to briefly showcase groundbreaking musicians and artists in Arabic music from the 1960's to the present, including (but not limited to) music that has fueled the Arab Spring.

Here are some segments from the talk/dinner which took place at the Bechtel International Center on the Stanford University campus on May 13, 2013 from 6-7:30 pm.

Highlights from Talk (watch below or at https://youtu.be/RjpG8vE4XCQ).



Here are some pics from the event:







Thursday, April 19, 2012

Arab Satire Night at Stanford : A Huge Success



The Arab Satire Night at Stanford University was attended by a packed audience that came to laugh at/with the lighter side of the Arab Spring.  Congrats to Ahmed Benchemsi and Lina Khatib plus all the students who helped make the event such a success.  From Egypt to Tunisia to Syria and more, we were all treated to a much needed dose of laughter with substance.

Here are some pictures from the event:

















Monday, April 9, 2012

Women's Role in the Arab Spring by Dr. Lina Khatib

This event took place at Stanford University on Thursday April 12, 2012 at noon.  See pictures below.


Pictures from the event featuring Dr. Lina Khatib:











Saturday, March 17, 2012

Season Finale of Arabology (Ep 9) ft interview with Dr. Marwan D. Hanania



The 9th episode (First Season Finale) of 'Arabology' (3/15/12) features my interview with Dr. Marwan Hanania, Visiting Scholar for the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies at Stanford University who showcases the history of Amman, Jordan and discusses the notion of an Arab Spring in Jordan and the region.

This episode also features music by Mashrou' Leila, Emel Mathlouthi, Jadal, El Gusto Orchestra of Algiers, Aswat, Fairouz, Rahim Alhaj, Cheb Mami, Abdel Hadi Halo, Joubran Trio, Nadine Labaki, more.

To Download, go to: http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/58493

To listen please go to this link:
http://www.radio4all.net/responder.php/download/58493/65276/78953/?url=http://www.radio4all.net/files/author30@gmail.com/4294-1-arabology_s1_e9.mp3

Dr. Marwan Hanania at KZSU Stanford 90.1 FM

Playlist for ArabologyThursday, 15 March 2012  4pm - 6pmDJ: Ramzi S.
ArtistTrackAlbum/Label
Mashrou' LeilaEl Hal RomancyAlbum ReviewEl Hal Romancy
Mashrou' Leila
JadalSalmaArabic Rocks
Forward Music

Interview with Dr. Marwan D HananiaInterview part 1Arabology
KZSU
Diana KarazonEnsani Ma BinsakDiana Karazon
Music Master Saudia Arabia

Interview with Dr. Marwan D HananiaInterview part 2Arabology
KZSU

Mathlouthi, EmelKelmti Horra (My Word Is Free)Album ReviewKelmti Horra
World Village
El Gusto Orchestra Of AlgiersYa Rayih Wayne Misafer (Where Are You Going, Emigrant?)Album ReviewEl Gusto
Quidam Productions/Remark Music
Halo, Abdel HadiMin Yaati Kalbu Lil Melah (Who Will Bring His Heart To The Jewish Quarter?)Album ReviewAbdel Hadi Halo & El Gusto Orchestra Of Algiers
Honest Jon's Records

Labaki, NadineHashishet albiWhere Do We Go Now? (Soundtrack)
Sony
Mahmoud El HusseiniSegara BonnyBeirut Hotel
LFP Les Fims Pelle'as

Ayoub, ElizabethYa OudAlbum ReviewOceanos Y Lunas
Four Quarters Entertainment
Joubran TrioNawwâr (Enlightener)Album ReviewAsfar
Harmonia Mundi France
Diab, Amr'aref Habibi (You Know My Love)Album ReviewBanadeek Ta'ala (I'm Calling You, Come)
Laser
Ajram, NancySallim 'alayha (Greet Her)Album ReviewSahret Tarab (A Night Of Ecstacy)
New Sound

AswatTayr Al-WirwarWinter Concert 2009
Zawaya

FayrouzOssa Zghiri KtirAlbum ReviewEh, Fi Amal (Yes, There Is Hope)
Fbe
Alhaj, RahimTaqsim Maqam MukhalifAlbum ReviewWhen The Soul Is Settled: Music Of Iraq
Smithsonian/Folkways
Cheb MamiViens HabibiDellali
Mondo Melodia
Taha, RachidHabinaAlbum ReviewRock El Casbah: The Best Of
Wrasse Records






Ramzi Salti's Arabology Radio Show Counts Down Top 20 Indie Arabic Songs of 2018

Listen to this episode at  https://soundcloud.com/arabology/top2018 The latest episode of the popular radio show Arabology , which air...