Showing posts with label tunis. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tunis. Show all posts

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Emel Mathlouthi Wows San Francisco (2017)

Emel Mathlouthi at Cafe du Nord, SF on May 16, 2017
Legendary Tunisian singer/songwriter/producer Emel Mathlouthi, whose early songs served as the soundtrack to the Tunisian Revolution and the Arab Spring, performed to a full crowd at San Francisco's Cafe du Nord on May 16, 2017.  The evening was one to remember for a long time to come.

Although this one-night only bay area performance mainly served to promote Emel's latest CD, titled Ensen, the performer did not shy away from singing some of her older hits, including her legendary song "Kelmti Horra"--a performance that brought the house down.


But perhaps the highlight of the evening was the impromptu songs that Emel sang with the audience which seemed quite content to sing along--even in Arabic--while demandeing encore after encore.  One of those priceless moments was captured in the video below where the Tunisian songstress, deluged by requests for more songs, was happy to oblige.

Video Highlights from Emel Mathlouthi's SF Concert: https://youtu.be/5k6mOxc1_kQ



The day following her SF concert, Emel performed in LA--the last stop on her US tour.




Sunday, April 30, 2017

Emel Mathlouthi to Perform in San Francisco on May 16, 2017

Emel Mathlouthi will perform in San Francisco on May 16, 2017

If there is one concert that San Franciscans cannot afford to miss this year, it is Emel Mathlouthi's performance at the Swedish American Hall in San Francisco on Tuesday May 16, 2017 at 8 pm (doors open at 7 pm). Make sure you get your tickets at this link.

This one-night only San Francisco concert is part of Mathlouthi's world tour as she promotes her critically acclaimed new album Ensen (for other places click here).  It also marks her first return to the bay area since her unforgettable concert at Stanford's Bing Concert Hall in October 2016.

Tunisian prominent Singer/Songwriter Emel second album Ensen was produced by her own record label “Little Human Records” and released on Partisan Records on 24 February 2017.  This much anticipated album wowed critics and audiences worldwide--not an easy feat considering the fact that Emel’s first album, Kelmti Horra (My Word is Free) is considered as "The Voice of the Tunisian Revolution." On Ensen, she’s merged to a style that’s even more uniquely her own, combining organic and electronic sounds to produce a record that will appeal to any lover of innovative and heartfelt music.



Below are some of Emel Mathlouthi's most memorable performances, including short clips from her Stanford concert in October 2016:


Emel Mathlouthi at the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize Concert.  Click CC for English subtitles):

Highlights from Emel Mathouthi's 2 Performances at Stanford's Bing Concert Hall in October 2016 (Unlisted Video):

Emel Mathlouthi's Lunch talk with Dr. Ramzi Salti at Stanford's Markaz Recource Center (Oct 2016):

Emel Mathlouthi's Video Clip for her song "Ensen Dhaif (Human, Helpless Human)"


Remember to purchase your tickets for Emel Mathlouthi's May 16, 2017 San Francisco Concert at THIS LINK.  See you there!

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Emel Mathlouthi Wows Stanford University

Emel Mathlouthi at Bing Concert Hall (Stanford) on Oct 5, 2016

Tunisian singer Emel Mathlouthi aka the Voice of the Tunisian Revolution, thrilled audiences at Stanford University when she came to the campus on Oct 5-6, 2016 where she conducted a lunch talk at the Markaz (moderated by Stanford Lecturer Dr. Ramzi Salti), an unforgettable concert at Bing Concert Hall, and a student matinee, also at the Bing, the following day. These events were made possible by Stanford Live, the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies and the Institute for Diversity in the Arts as part of a series called Islamic Voices.

A strident songstress whose intensity is cloaked in mellifluous vocals, Emel Mathlouthi is also known for her role as a leading artist in the Arab Spring. Born in Tunis, she was shunned from her country's official airwaves but rose to prominence through social media. She released her first album, Kelmti Horra (my word is free) in 2012, garnering lavish praise from critics and fans for her powerful vocals laid over a unique mix of north african rythyms and modern electronic beats. Her 2015 was prolific, including work on a new album with producer Valgeir Siggurdson and culminating with her solo performance at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony. Called one of the top fifteen acts of 2015 by popmatters, Emel Mathlouthi is a unique artist with a powerful message and a voice beyond comparison (source emelmathlouthi.com).

During her lunch talk at Stanford's Markaz Resource Center on Oct 5, Emel Mathlouthi conversed with Dr. Ramzi Salti about her music, career and thoughts on the Tunisian Revolution.  Below is a video containing highlights from that talk (link at https://youtu.be/vreomAqUIWc)



Emel Mathlouthi's major concert at Bing Concert Hall later that evening proved to be a huge success with the singer performing hits from her first CD Kelmti Horra and her upcoming CD Ensan (to be released in January 2017). The concert was preceded by a PRE-CONCERT TALK at 6:30 pm by Dr. Ramzi Salti, host of the Arabology radio show/podcast, and Professor Joel Beinin--both of whom set the stage in a discussion of the Tunisian Revolution, how it launched the Arab Spring, and how Mathlouthi's music became its soundtrack.

Here is a video of Dr. Ramzi Salti's portion of the intro at the Bing (7 minutes):
(link at https://youtu.be/5RI-sAhCKuE).



After the concert, Emel Mathlouthi met with scores of her fans backstage, signing autographs and taking pictures with fans who came from all over the San Francisco bay area to attend her show.


Emel Mathlouthi with Dr. Ramzi Salti (right) and her siblings Walid and Narjess

Ramzi Salti with Emel Mathlouthi
The day following the concert, Stanford Live opened their student matinee season with Emel Mathlouthi and a more intimate concert at the Bing Concert Hall. This event was open to all Bay Area K-12 schools and teachers and included a Q & A session that was moderated by Dr. Ramzi Salti.

Here are video highlights of  Dr. Ramzi Salti's intro/Q&A session for the Matinée Performance. (Link at https://youtu.be/yBO9urHw7_E).



You can also check Dr. Ramzi Salti's radio interview with Emel Mathlouthi, recorded prior to her arrival at Stanford, below or via this link: https://soundcloud.com/arabology/emelmathlouthi2016


Here is Emel's brand new song/video clip 'Ensen Dhaif' (Official Video) from her upcoming album.  Watch below or at https://youtu.be/TXv5ByGSsbA



Monday, September 26, 2016

Emel Mathlouthi in Concert at Stanford on Oct 5, 2016



Emel Mathlouthi aka the "voice of the Tunisian revolution" brings her songs to Bing Concert Hall at Stanford University on Wednesday Oct 5, 2015 at 7:30 pm. The concert is preceded by a talk by Dr. Ramzi Salti and Prof Joel Beinin at 6:30pm. Buy your tickets here and arrive at 6:30 pm to attend both the talk + concert.

PRE-CONCERT TALK: At 6:30 pm, ]قز Ramzi Salti, host of the podcast Arabology, and Professor Joel Beinin set the stage for Emel Mathlouthi by discussing the Tunisian Revolution, how it launched the Arab Spring, and how her music became its soundtrack.

Tunisian singer and activist Emel Mathlouthi earned the title "the voice of the Arab Spring" with her 2007 recording My Word Is Free  كلمتي حرة—and in the process became her country's Joan Baez (her role model).

"I see art as a very revolutionary way to change mentalities,” says the Tunisian-born Mathlouthi. This potent artist is a singer of compelling, confessional impact, whose music embraces suffering, love, and an ache for home. Though her roots are in folk music, her sound mingles rock, trip-hop, and electronica with Arabic undertones. Her songs of freedom and compassion also earned her a spotlight at the 22nd Annual Nobel Peace Prize Concert in 2015.

Emel Mathlouthi performing at 2015 Nobel Prize Ceremony: https://youtu.be/wJ79iEfus8E


Purchase your tickets for the pre-concert talk + Emel's Concert via this link: http://www.stanfordlivetickets.org/single/SYOS.aspx?p=6825





Sunday, October 4, 2015

Emel Mathlouthi Touring the US in October




Tunisian singing legend Emel Mathlouthi, whose music has been credited for fueling the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions, will be performing at the following venues in the US this October:

Sept 25th & 26th: Globaquerque Festival, Albuquerque, New mexico
Oct 1st: Skirball Center, Los Angeles, California
Oct 12th: National Sawdust, Brooklyn, New York
Oct 16th: Herbst Theatre, San Fransisco, California
Oct 29th: Stewart Theatre, Raleigh, North Carolina

Emel Mathlouthi kindly granted Arabology radio host Dr. Ramzi Salti an interview which you can hear below or at https://soundcloud.com/arabology/emelmathlouthi


About Emel Mathlouthi:
In 2007, the Tunisian singer, guitarist, and composer, Emel Mathlouthi, fled the home country that banned her songs and moved to France. There, she further developed a repertoire that vented a yearning for freedom. With lyrics provided by Amin El Ghozzi, she wrote and performed "Kelmti Horra" ("My World Is Free"), which ultimately went viral on social media and became an anthem of the 2010 Arab Spring.

Mathlouthi sings mainly in classical Arabic or Tunisian dialects. Her self-produced album marries a lyrical purity of voice with western strings, Maghrebi percussion and electronica. On her debut album, she inhabits, and makes her own, elements from rock and folk, fado and flamenco, Celtic and Tzigane, north African gnawa and rai.

Born in 1982, she admired her father's collection of vintage protest songs, from Bob Dylan to Victor Jara. And she was captivated by the free expression of blind Egyptian troubadour, Sheikh Imam. After studying graphic design at Tunis University, she discovered the release and rebellion of rock and hasn't looked back.

"I never dreamed that my songs would be sung on the streets," she says. "For more than 50 years, we have been ruled by dictators. We aren't used to deciding for ourselves... but the revolution is not finished."

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Meet Hamada “El General” Ben Amr, the Tunisian Rapper Who Changed the World

http://popdust.com/2011/01/28/meet-hamada-el-general-ben-amor-the-tunsian-rapper-who-changed-the-world/

حمادة بن عمر "الجنرال" واغنية رئيس البلاد


Hamada “El General” Ben Amr (Amor)
As riots and protests spread throughout Tunisia a few weeks ago, one song helped fan the flames of revolution—and its moment may not be over. In a country plagued with censorship, a Facebook sensation was made of a video called “President, Your People Are Dying,” رئيس البلاد performed by 22-year-old Hamada Ben Amr  حمادة بن عمر (a.k.a. El Général; name can also be spelled Hamada Ben Amor or Ben Aoun).  In the clip, the rapper speaks firmly and directly to now-former President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali about the unemployment and hunger ravaging the country while Ben Ali’s family lived in opulence. December saw the self-immolation of Sidi Bouzid after his produce cart was seized by authorities and the Wikileaks reports where ambassadors spoke openly about government corruption. The feelings of resentment about the poverty, police brutality and government ills were captured perfectly in the song—and subsequently Ben Amr was arrested, sparking more even protests and furor until President Ben Ali fled the country. Its direct role in the Tunisian uprising and potential role in the current instability in the Middle East may make it one of the most influential hip-hop songs of all time.


ABOUT THE SONG




Here are some things to know about the song (Taken from Popdust.com; to read the entire blog entry, see Popdust.com):
1. It’s Sung In Arabic: Naturally, since that’s the national language of Tunisia.
2. It Got Personal: Supporters of the uprising were enraged when Ben Amor was arrested and called in for questions. Ben-Amor’s brother Hamdi said, “Some 30 plainclothes policemen came to our house to arrest Hamada and took him away without ever telling us where to. When we asked why they were arresting him, they said, ‘He knows why.’” The irony of a musician decrying an oppressive police state and then being called in by the secret police was not lost. Because of this collision between protest and power, the song became integral to the protests.

Here are the translated lyrics, courtesy of Hiphopdiplomacy.com



Why are you worried?
Would you tell me something? Don’t be afraid!
Mr. President, today I am speaking in name of myself and of all the people
who are suffering in 2011, there are still people dying of hunger
who want to work to survive, but their voice was not heard
get off into the street and see, people have become like animals
see the police with batons, takatak they don’t care
since there is no one telling him to stop
even the law of the constitution, put it in water and drink it.
Every day I hear of invented process, in spite of the servants of the state know
I see the snake that strikes women in headscarves
you accept it for your daughter?
You know these are words that make your eyes weep
as a father does not want to hurt her children
then this is a message from one of your children
who is telling of his suffering
we are living like dogs
half of the people living in filth
and drank from a cup of suffering

Mr. President your people is dead
many people eat from garbage
and you see what is happening in the country
misery everywhere and people who have not found a place to sleep
I am speaking in name of the people who are suffering and were put under the feet
Mr President, you told me to speak without fear
But I know that eventually I will take just slaps
I see too much injustice and so I decided to send this message even though the people told me that my end is death
But until when the Tunisian will leave in dreams, where is the right of expression?
They are just words ..
Tunis was defined the “green”, but there is only desert divided into 2,
it is a direct robbery by force that dominated a country
without naming already everybody knows who they are
much money was pledged for projects and infrastructure
schools, hospitals, buildings, houses
But the sons of dogs have already fattened
They stole, robbed, kidnapped and were unwilling to leave the chair
I know that there are many words in the heart of the people but don’t come out
if there was not this injustice I would not be here to say these things
Mr. President your people is dead
many people eat from garbage
and you see what is happening in the country
misery everywhere and people who have not found a place to sleep
I am speaking in name of the people who are suffering and were put under the feet
Ben Amr also has another song available on the internet titled تونس بلادنا (Tunisia Is Our Country) with similar themes:






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Ramzi Salti's Arabology Radio Show Counts Down Top 20 Indie Arabic Songs of 2018

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