Showing posts with label Arabic Language. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Arabic Language. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Mete Tasin Sings "Lamma Badda Yatathanna" Live in Concert

Dr. Ramzi Salti (left) introduces Tenor Mate Tasin 

Turkish Opera singer Mete Tasin, whose repertoire has long included songs in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Persian, and Turkish, recently debuted an amazing rendition of the song "Lamma Bada Yatathanna" لما بدا يتثنى  in Arabic.  The song was introduced by Stanford Lecturer Dr. Ramzi Salti during Mete's concert at Angelica's in Redwood City on Saturday April 28, 2018 and left the audience cheering for more.  You can watch Mete's performance below or at https://youtu.be/owP7nqpVMyM


Lamma Bada Yatathanna is an ancient muwashshah, a genre of secular music from Al Andalus, Moorish Spain, which means it’s from some time before 1492. Here are the lyrics in Arabic and in English translation:

لما بدا يتثـنى *** حبي جمـاله فتنــا
أوما بلحظه أسرنا *** غصن سـنا حين مال
وعدي ويا حيرتى *** من لي رحيم شكوتي
في الحب من لوعتي ***إلا مليـك الجمــال

When my beloved begins to sway,
His/her beauty drives me to distraction
When I am enraptured by a glimpse,
My beloved’s beauty is a tender branch caught by the breeze;
Oh my destiny, my perplexity,
No one can comfort me in my misery,
In my lamenting and suffering for love,
But for the one in the beautiful mirage

Mete Tasin is a compelling and versatile opera singer who was born in Germany and raised in Turkey. He studied with Prof. Guzin GUREL at Istanbul University State Conservatory and Patricia McCaffrey at Brooklyn College (Master of Music). His career began in Minnesota, USA with Carmen ( Don Jose ) and Lucia di Lammermoor ( Arturo ). Mete has been in many leading roles in Europe, United States and Turkey.

For more info about Mete, see http://www.metetasin.com/

Saturday, July 18, 2015

Dr. Ramzi Salti Interviewed on AATV

Watch the video at https://youtu.be/VMgvU0Kaxqk

Dr. Ramzi Salti, Lecturer at Stanford + Radio Host of 'Arabology' on KZSU Stanford 90.1 FM, was recently interviewed by Suad Asfour (AATV) about his teaching, his publications and his radio show.  The taping took place on July 14, 2015 at the ABC TV News/CreaTV  Building in San Jose, California.

You can watch the video below or at https://youtu.be/VMgvU0Kaxqk









Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Arabology Podcast Available (March 3, 2015)

Arabology 9.6 aired on March 3. 2015. Podcast includes Arabic music from North Africa and the Levant; Arabic and English translations by Stanford students of Arabic; Interview with Photographer Najib Joe Hakim; Interview with Jordanian Talk Show Host Jude Jweihan.



Playlist for Arabology Tuesday, 3 March 2015 1pm - 3pm
1. Generation Bass/ Super Strength/ Cairo Liberation Font Vol 1/GB
2. Gnawa Diffusion/ Ya Laymi/ World Reggae/ Putumayo World Music
3. Labess/ El Kass Yadour/ Identite/ Needlepoint Records
4. Rachid Taha, Now Or Never/ Zoom/ Naive
5. Khaled/ Bab Jenna (Gate Of Heaven)/C'est La Vie/ Universal Music France
6. Souad Massi/ Raoui / Women of Africa/ Putumayo World Music
7. Stanford Students of Arabic (Y1)speak Arabic
8. Badrawies & Hesham Watany/ Sa3at Sa3at/ Single/ NA
9. Luka/ Bashrab Hashish/ El Khayt wal 7ayt Soundtrack/ Directed by Mohamed Khaled
10. Report about 'She Who Tells A Sorry: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World' Exhibit at Stanford.
11. Interview with Najib Joe Hakim about his 'Home away from home' Photo Exhibit
12. Ahmet Baglama/ Baglama/ Single/ Ahmet Baglama
13. Hiba Tawaji/ Les moulins de mon coeur (Arabic)/ Watary
14. Maya Hobeika/ Law tiktibli byout / Ward/ Maya Hobeika
15. Interview with Jude Jweihan, Host of 'The Jude Show' (Jordan)
16. Ashraf Sweilem/ Toul Omry/ Toul Omry Soundtrack/ Ilyas Iliyya
17. Khan El Rouh/ Ya Welah/ Ya Welah/ Obay Al-Sha'arani
18. Emel Mathlouthi/ Dhalem (Tyrant)/ Kelmti Horra/ World Village
19. Tania Kassis/ Islamo- Christian Ave/ Single/ Tania Kassis


Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Coca Cola Ad Campaign Features 'America the Beautiful' Sung in English, Arabic and Other Languages

See video at http://youtu.be/jn8fK6r9ayc

Meet Naya and hear her sing "America the Beautiful" in Arabic, one of the many languages in Coca- Cola's 2014 Big Game ad. #AmericaIsBeautiful. In addition to a gorgeous English version, the campaign includes a multitude of tributes to America in other tongues including Spanish, Tagalog. Hindi, Senegalese-French, Mandarin, Spanish, Hindi, Hebrew and Keres. Versions of the song performed in other languages are also on Spotify, as well as the multilingual version. Look under the "Coca-Cola Singers" or "Coca-Cola Chorus."

Coca Cola - It's Beautiful in Arabic (http://youtu.be/jn8fK6r9ayc)



Coca-Cola - It's Beautiful - Official :60 (http://youtu.be/443Vy3I0gJs)



Coca-Cola - It's Beautiful - Behind the Scenes (http://youtu.be/1ReHUMUb9gY)


Coca-Cola - It's Beautiful in English (http://youtu.be/TASniuDNKZw)


Here is a Playlist of various Americans singing 'America the Baeutiful' in Englsih and in other languages:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCIVZWq1FAwcWJmgdF5o3-QTZZ-OnBUgA



Coca Cola stated that "the only thing more beautiful than this country are the people who live here." Watch and discover why #AmericaIsBeautiful and visit this playlist: http://youtube.com/AmericaIsBeautiful

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Shannon's Story: Learning Arabic


Say "Marhaba" to Shannon Elizabeth Munyan and chances are that she will respond to you in fluent Arabic. That may not sound strange, but for an American national, who is lived in the Middle East for just over 3 years, it is a significant achievement which has opened up a world of opportunities, both personally and professionally. Watch this video to find out how Shannon has managed to learn Arabic in such a short time and how the world around her has changed, in her own words.
Here is a video clip of Shannon's story (http://youtu.be/B4sYb069tIM):



Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Registration Open for my Beginning Arabic Night Course at Stanford (Starts 9/25)


If you live in the San Francisco bay area and are interested in learning Arabic from scratch this Fall...

Registration now open for my Beginning Arabic class at Stanford on Wednesday evenings 7-9 pm starting 9/25 for 10 weeks. Anyone is welcome and no prior knowledge of Arabic needed. Spread the word and/or register at https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/course.php?cid=20131_ARB+01

Beginning Arabic I

(ARB 01)
This course is intended for anyone interested in learning the Arabic alphabet as well as basic communication skills in Arabic. Instead of emphasizing the complex grammatical and syntactical structure of the language, this course will spotlight useful Arabic words, phrases, and sentences in a way that will equip students to communicate on a basic level with native Arabic speakers. The course will concentrate on using, pronouncing, and understanding Arabic expressions through interaction with fellow students and the instructor.
This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The textbook assigned for Arabic Level I will also be used for Level II. Students may enroll in this introductory course without intending to take both courses in the sequence.
Ramzi Salti, Lecturer in Arabic Language, Stanford
Ramzi Salti received a PhD in comparative literature (with a primary emphasis on Arabic literature) from UC Riverside. He received the Stanford Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2004 and an Honorable Mention for the Associated Students of Stanford University Teacher of the Year award in 2009. He was recently awarded the John S. Knight Journalism Fellowship for “Favorite Professor 2013.”

Textbooks for this course:
(Required) Salti, Course Reader
Download the Preliminary Syllabus (subject to change)

Register at https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/course.php?cid=20131_ARB+01


Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Learning Arabic is Problematic: A Humorous Look

The web site #arabic problems (http://arabicproblems.tumblr.com/) has taken a very creative approach to the difficulties that most American students face when learning Arabic. The web site states that "Learning Arabic is problematic, yo" and goes on to humorously demonstrate some of the resulting frustrations, word play, and more. The content is particularly funny for those students who studied using Al-Kitaab Fii Taallum Al-Arabiyya.

Check out the site at http://arabicproblems.tumblr.com/

Saturday, February 2, 2013

Al-Fusha Mofida: Video by Middlebury Arabic School 2012

The following video titled 'Al-Fusha Mofida' [Classical Arabic Is Useful] was creatively and humorously made by students at the Middlebury Arabic School 2012.  Kudos to Jesse McConnell!

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Learning a Language, and Relearning a Country by Hugh Martin (NYT)

Below is a portion of a beautifully written essay by HUGH MARTIN titled "Learning a Language, and Relearning a Country" which was published in The New York Times on August 27, 2012.  If you like it, then I strongly urge you to read the whole piece at http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/27/learning-a-language-and-relearning-a-country/

Quote from the New York Times: "For Hugh Martin, taking Arabic as a student almost six years after he had returned as a soldier meant coming to terms with his conditioned prejudices and fears."

Courtesy of Hugh Martin (the author).

Here is a small portion from Hugh Martin's piece in The New York Times (c).   See the complete piece at http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/27/learning-a-language-and-relearning-a-country/

Running late to class in my third week of Arabic, I jogged up the angled staircase, past the drinking fountains, then turned the corner. My classroom was four doors down the hallway. As I glanced up, I almost smacked heads with a girl — all I saw were her large brown eyes dilated in front of me. Both of us jumped. 

The encounter was eerily similar to the one I’d had that night in Sadiya: her body was covered completely in a black abaya and her head in a black hijab, and a purple veil hid her whole face, except her eyes and the upper bridge of her nose. In this hallway, it was common to see women in traditional Muslim dress because many of the Arabic classes took place on this floor. But for that second, not only was I startled from almost running into someone, but the sudden sight of her veiled face so close to my own caused a slight tinge of nervousness, even fear. In my conscience, I sensed that a vague “danger” signal was going off, and felt wrong for being so close to a woman dressed in traditional Arab garb.

“Excuse me,” I mumbled and stepped to the side. She looked to the ground and passed. Not surprisingly, within seconds, the fear vanished and I felt guilt for having it. My palms were sweating. It’d been more than six years since I’d returned. In some ways, I thought I’d grown, matured, simply gotten over this prejudice, this fear I had had that was so clear on that first raid in Sadiya when I came face to face — the first of many times — with an Iraqi woman in her own home. I knew this cautiousness and suspicion had been necessary in Iraq, but now, back in America, I had to trick myself out of it. This fear seemed to rise from the subconscious: an instinct, not a choice.

Seconds later, as I swung open the door and walked into class, the 20 or so heads of my peers glanced at me. Six or seven girls, including my teacher, looked up in the clothing they wore every day: heads covered with a hijab, only their faces visible. I avoided looking at them because I felt that this prejudice radiated off of me. The white, bearded male, the Iraq veteran — his suspicion and fear of traditional Muslim dress clear in his eyes. Obviously I imagined their thinking this, knowing this, but was it just all in my head?

Read the entire essay at http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/27/learning-a-language-and-relearning-a-country/

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Arabology Ep 7 Podcast (May 24, 2012) ft Arabic Lecturer Dr. Eva Hashem, Student Cyana Chilton, Film Review, Music!

Episode 7 of Arabology aired on May 24, 2012 with guests Dr. Eva Hashem, Cyana Chilton, tons of alternative Arabic songs plus movie review of 'Monsieur Lazhar' by Ahmad Qousi (see more info below).

LISTEN: http://tinyurl.com/arabologys2e7
DOWNLOAD: http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/60294

http://tinyurl.com/arabologys2e7


The 7th Episode of the 2nd Season of 'Arabology' (aired May 24, 2012) includes my interview with Arabic Lecturer Dr. Eva Hashem who discusses the challenges and benefits of teaching Arabic at Stanford plus an interview with Cyana Chilton, a Stanford studemt of Arabic who discusses her linguistic journey as well her stay in Morocco last year.

Show also features a film review of 'Monsieur Lazhar' by Ahmad Qousi as well as music tracks by Yasmine Hamdan, Toot Ard, Tania Kassis, Dam, Mike Massy, Adonis, Tania Saleh, Joubran Trio, Cheb Khaled, Emel Mathlouthi, Zeid Hamdan, Dub Snakkr, and Martin Leon.

My Interviews with Eva Hashem and Cyana Chilton

Monday, March 12, 2012

'Why Learning Arabic Is So Hard' By Robert Lane Greene

I am sharing this this piece by Robert lane Greene with everyone because he does a great job of pointing to the often misunderstood 'rules' of learning a language like Arabic.  He cleverly recounts many of the things that I have heard from my own students of Arabic at Stanford through the years.

The original piece appears at:  http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2005/06/im_trying_to_learn_arabic.html  (all rights reserved to the author)

I'm Trying To Learn Arabic

Why's it taking so long?


I'm one of a growing wave of people trying to come to grips with Arabic, a language long neglected by Americans in the years before Sept. 11. Since then, the CIA and the military have tried to recruit Arab-American "heritage speakers." The federal government has spent tons of money, both teaching Arabic to spies and soldiers at its specialized schools and encouraging university students to study it. College enrollment in Arabic classes doubled between 1998 and 2002, with much of the increase coming in a patriotic spike after the World Trade Center attacks. As a foreign-affairs writer, I thought it would be good to give it a shot.

But these patriotic students are probably finding, as I am, that learning Arabic is complicated. The first challenge, the script, is a tough one. But it is by no means the biggest. Arabic has an alphabet, so it's easier than, say, Chinese, which has a set of thousands of characters. There are just 28 letters, and it does not take long to get used to writing and reading right-to-left. (Though it still feels odd to open my book from what seems like the back.) Most of the letters have four different forms, depending on whether they stand alone or come at the beginning, middle, or end of a word. Even then, so far so good. But in Arabic, as in Hebrew, people don't include most vowels when writing. Maktab, or "office," is just written mktb. Vowels are included as little marks above and below in beginning textbooks, but you soon have to get used to doing without them. Whn y knw th lngg wll ths s nt tht hrd. But when you're struggling with comprehension to begin with, it's pretty formidable.

Then there are the sounds those letters represent. I do not recommend chewing gum in Arabic class, because a host of noises articulated in the back of the throat makes it likely that the gum will end up in your lungs. Arabic has one "h" akin to ours, and another that has been described as the sound you would make trying to blow out a candle with air from your throat. That's not to be confused with another sound, the fricative kh familiar to German-speakers as the sound in "Bach." There's also 'ayn, a "voiced pharyngeal fricative," which is like the first sound in the hip-hop "a'ight." Unwritten in Roman-alphabet transliterations, it's actually a consonant that begins many common words and names, including "Arab," "Iraq," and "Arafat."

The sounds are tough, but the words are tougher. An English-speaking student learning a European language will run across many familiar-looking words, but English-speaking Arabic students are not so lucky. Merav, an Israeli classmate, should have a leg up on us: Arabic and Hebrew both use a nifty, three-letter root system for word building. The three-letter root represents a general area of meaning, and different prefixes, vowel additions, and suffixes can make it into a person engaged in that activity, the place where it goes on, the general concept, and so on. Most famous is slm, which generally means "peace."Salaam is the noun for "peace," Islam is "surrender," and a Muslim is "one who surrenders." (In Hebrew, this can be seen in shalom.) Ktb functions similarly for writing:Kitaab is "book," kaatib is "writer," maktaba is "library."

Merav is fine with this, though the rest of us are struggling. But the ferociously unfamiliar grammar sets us all adrift. Arabic is a VSO language, which means the verb usually comes before the subject and object. It has a dual number, so nouns and verbs must be learned in singular, dual, and plural. A present-tense verb has 13 forms. There are three noun cases and two genders. Some European languages have just as many forms to keep track of, but in Arabic the idiosyncrasies can be mind-boggling. When Karam explains that numbers are marked for gender—but most numbers take the opposite gender from the word they are modifying—we students stare at each other in slack-jawed solidarity. When we learn that adjectives modifying nonhuman plurals always have a feminine singular form—meaning that "the cars are new" comes out as "the cars, she are new"—I can hear heads banging on the desks around me. I want to do the same.

Karam sees the wear and tear on us, and so sometimes we pause and have a cultural chat. Arabic is peppered with a lot of God—even secular Arabs will append insha'allah, "God willing," to almost any statement of intent, as in, "I'll file my story by 3, God willing." Sometimes Karam tries to teach us how to work various niceties like this into daily speech. "Thank you" is usually just shukran. "But," Karam tells us, "that is sort of boring, so if someone gives you food it's nicer to say, 'May your hands be blessed,' or …" This is way too much information for my skill level, so I squeeze my eyes shut and hope that Karam's flourishes don't enter my brain and dislodge something vital, like, "Where is the bathroom?"

The State Department reckons that it takes 80 to 88 weeks (roughly a year in the classroom full-time and a year in-country) to get to a level 3 on a 5-point scale in Modern Standard Arabic, the language I am learning. But there's a twist. MSA has about the same role in the Arab world that Latin had in medieval Europe: It's the language of writing, religion, and formal speeches, but it is no one's native spoken language any more. Arabic has long since become a series of "dialects," which are actually more like separate languages, as many varieties are mutually incomprehensible. Arabic spoken in Morocco is as different from Arabic spoken in Egypt and from Modern Standard as French is from Spanish and Latin. When Arabs from different regions talk to each other, they improvise a mix of Egyptian Arabic (which is understood widely because of Egypt's movie industry), Modern Standard, and a bit of their own dialects.

So, if I go to Egypt or Lebanon in a year, having managed to get some near grip on my classroom language, I will be walking down the street asking people for a bite to eat in something that will sound almost as conversationally inappropriate to them as Shakespearean English would to us. Most literate Arabs know the Modern Standard from schooling, newspapers, television, sermons, and the like, though, so hopefully they will not laugh too hard as they help me out and respond in something I can almost understand. And that is if I work my tail off for the next year. Insha'allah.

The original piece appears at:  http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2005/06/im_trying_to_learn_arabic.html  (all rights reserved to the author)

Sunday, December 4, 2011

American Student of Arabic Offers Arabic One-Liners to Hit on Arab Girls.

'The Arabic Student' has been been blogging or about 3 years now and has had a great response from Arabs and those learning Arabic alike. On his blog, http://thearabicstudent.blogspot.com/, he often teaches and discusses various phrases in Arabic and English in a often humorous and poignant ways.

Here, he offers one liners in Arabic to hit on Arab girls:



Check out thearabicstudent's blog at http://thearabicstudent.blogspot.com/

Check out his YouTube Channel (user name saxquiz) at http://youtu.be/EWauNXYmCxM

Ramzi Salti's Arabology Radio Show Counts Down Top 20 Indie Arabic Songs of 2018

Listen to this episode at  https://soundcloud.com/arabology/top2018 The latest episode of the popular radio show Arabology , which air...